Welcome to the tumblr for Pickler Memorial Library at Truman State University! We'll be updating with all the cool stuff we'll have on display.

“A Soldier of the Union mustered out,”

Is the inscription on an unknown grave

At Newport News, beside the salt-sea wave,

Nameless and dateless; sentinel or scout

Shot down in skirmish, or disastrous rout

Of battle, where the loud artillery drave

Its iron wedges through the ranks of brave

And doomed battalions, storming the redoubt.

Thou unknown hero sleeping by the sea

In thy forgotten grave! with secret shame

I feel my pulses beat, my forehead burn,

When I remember thou hast given for me

All that thou hast, thy life, thy very name,

And I can give thee nothing in return.

-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The War inspired a great many works of art, like this poem by Longfellow, which captures some of the sorrow caused by the fighting.

Moving an army is not an easy task.  Soldiers may be able to walk on their own two feet, but all the supplies necessary to sustain them cannot.  Wagons could break down, and pack animals could tire out.  When this happened, some supplies had to be left behind, including musical instruments.
Image of “Report of Camp & Garrison articles thrown out on the march to Huntsville, AL” 
Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Collections

Moving an army is not an easy task.  Soldiers may be able to walk on their own two feet, but all the supplies necessary to sustain them cannot.  Wagons could break down, and pack animals could tire out.  When this happened, some supplies had to be left behind, including musical instruments.

Image of “Report of Camp & Garrison articles thrown out on the march to Huntsville, AL” 

Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Collections

Here is one of the more chilling documents from the Violette Museum collection at Truman State University; it is the receipt of a slave sale dated 1807.  Slavery in Northeast Missouri was fairly common prior to the Civil War and, like it was in the rest of the country, was a divisive issue for Missourians.  As a border state that remained part of the Union but still had slaves, Missouri was the very definition of a house divided.

Here is one of the more chilling documents from the Violette Museum collection at Truman State University; it is the receipt of a slave sale dated 1807.  Slavery in Northeast Missouri was fairly common prior to the Civil War and, like it was in the rest of the country, was a divisive issue for Missourians.  As a border state that remained part of the Union but still had slaves, Missouri was the very definition of a house divided.

This document is a Certificate of Disability for Discharge.  The Civil War was brutal and left many soldiers without limbs or with debilitating injuries.

This document is a Certificate of Disability for Discharge.  The Civil War was brutal and left many soldiers without limbs or with debilitating injuries.

Okay, how cool is it that there were bullet-proof vests during the Civil War?  Apparently there were people creating bullet-proof vests as early as the middle ages!  They don’t seem to have really caught on until the 19th and 20th centuries though.
This ad was published in Harper’s Weekly during the war.  I guess you know it’s really wartime when the papers start advertising armor.  

Okay, how cool is it that there were bullet-proof vests during the Civil War?  Apparently there were people creating bullet-proof vests as early as the middle ages!  They don’t seem to have really caught on until the 19th and 20th centuries though.

This ad was published in Harper’s Weekly during the war.  I guess you know it’s really wartime when the papers start advertising armor.  

Soldiers in the Civil War sometimes lost faith in their cause, and this often led to desertion.  Private John G. Lacoste of the 63rd Regiment of Illinois was charged with being absent without leave - which was the nicer way to say he ran away.  
Image of Desertion Papers
Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Colletions

Soldiers in the Civil War sometimes lost faith in their cause, and this often led to desertion.  Private John G. Lacoste of the 63rd Regiment of Illinois was charged with being absent without leave - which was the nicer way to say he ran away.  

Image of Desertion Papers

Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Colletions

We thought this page from Harper’s Weekly was really cool.  It shows a military “stag dance.”  Clearly those soldiers were not going to let a lack of ladies get in the way of their fancy footwork!  
I wonder if they danced the polka?

We thought this page from Harper’s Weekly was really cool.  It shows a military “stag dance.”  Clearly those soldiers were not going to let a lack of ladies get in the way of their fancy footwork!  

I wonder if they danced the polka?

It’s funny to think about what constituted “pop music” back in the 1860s.  Polka music was  very popular around this time.  It fact, it was all the rage in the ballrooms of Prague and Paris in the early 1840s before it spread to the United States.  ”Polkamania” (I did not make that word up - google it) lasted through the nineteenth century.

Imagine showing off your fancy feet to this little number!

(Source: Spotify)

Here is a letter written by one of the Zeigler boys from the picture we just posted.  It was written by Samuel.

Here is a letter written by one of the Zeigler boys from the picture we just posted.  It was written by Samuel.

The Zeigler brothers came from a prominent Adair County family.  Several served in the Civil War, including Samuel and Clark Zeigler who were members of the 7th Missouri Volunteer Cavalry.  
Photo of Five Zeigler Brothers
Received of Steve Zeigler
Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Collections

The Zeigler brothers came from a prominent Adair County family.  Several served in the Civil War, including Samuel and Clark Zeigler who were members of the 7th Missouri Volunteer Cavalry.  

Photo of Five Zeigler Brothers

Received of Steve Zeigler

Courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library Special Collections